Group behind city’s marijuana rules mum on funding after filing reports 4 months late

Signs for the Progress for Michigan 2020 marijuana ballot proposal signs were collected this weekend because they were illegally placed in Port Huron parks and city rights-of-way. Officials said the same occurred for other candidates' signs.

It took the outside group behind Port Huron’s voter-approved marijuana law four months to comply with state campaign finance law — and so far, organizers aren’t getting any more specific about how the effort was funded.

Progress for Michigan 2020 spent roughly $63,000 on signature collecting, consulting and legal costs and promotional materials for its Nov. 3 marijuana proposal in the city, according to reports filed with the St. Clair County clerk’s office this week.

It’s reporting those costs as in-kind contributions to Jobs for Michigan Communities, the same name as another Michigan ballot committee. Committees can “bundle” contributions to campaigns in some instances under state statute.

When asked Thursday, Sam Pernick, treasurer and spokesman of Progress for Michigan 2020 and similar committees around the state, once again would not answer questions related to how the marijuana committee organizations have been supported financially.

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Signs for the Progress for Michigan 2020 marijuana ballot proposal signs were collected this weekend because they were illegally placed in Port Huron parks and city rights-of-way. Officials said the same occurred for other candidates' signs.

It took the outside group behind Port Huron’s voter-approved marijuana law four months to comply with state campaign finance law — and so far, organizers aren’t getting any more specific about how the effort was funded.

Progress for Michigan 2020 spent roughly $63,000 on signature collecting, consulting and legal costs and promotional materials for its Nov. 3 marijuana proposal in the city, according to reports filed with the St. Clair County clerk’s office this week.

It’s reporting those costs as in-kind contributions to Jobs for Michigan Communities, the same name as another Michigan ballot committee. Committees can “bundle” contributions to campaigns in some instances under state statute.

When asked Thursday, Sam Pernick, treasurer and spokesman of Progress for Michigan 2020 and similar committees around the state, once again would not answer questions related to how the marijuana committee organizations have been supported financially.

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